The Most Famous Luxor Tourist Attractions

Magic is hard to find but in the city of the sun “Luxor“, there is plenty of magic and wonder to behold. Luxor is known in ancient times as Thebes and also the city of hundred doors as it holds some of the most beautiful and breathtaking monuments, artifacts, temples such as Valley of the Kings, Karnak temple, Luxor temple, and much more amazing Luxor tourist attractions. So, Don’t miss the chance to cast your eyes on these glorious sights. 


Located on the east bank of the Nile, Karnak Temple Complex consists of a number of temples. Its name was given as in Arabic Karnak means fortified village.

Where is Luxor Temple located?  This temple might be the greatest testament to why Luxor has earned its nickname, “The World’s Largest Outdoor Museum&rdquo

Situated on the ancient site of Thebes, the Valley of the Kings is the ancient burial ground of many of Egypt's New Kingdom rulers, most famed collection tombs.

Hatshepsut temple is a reflection of the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II and was constructed alongside that 11th dynasty structure.

Colossi of Memnon, surviving for 3,400 years and known as an acoustic wonder of the ancient world, is the first monument tourists see in the west bank.

This temple was dedicated to Ramesses II and a testament to his power and influence and it was meant to be the greatest of all monuments.

Madinet Habu is situated in Luxor, about 6 km from Valley of the Kings. It was built by king Ramsess III in the 20th dynasty. It was built to be a Mortuary Temple. You ente

Luxor Museum is located in the Egyptian city of Luxor (ancient Thebes). It stands on the corniche, overlooking the River Nile, in the central part of the city. It was built

Deir Al-Medinah is unique in that it is the lone example of a well-preserved Egyptian village near Luxor. Kings and queens did not live here; this was the home of the craft

Tombs of the nobles is located near Luxor,Egypt.They are the burial places of some of the powerful courtiers and persons of ancient Egypt.

The Mummification Museum. Since Ancient Egyptians believed in life after death, mummification was practiced in order to preserve the body for the afterlife.